Your End of Year Financial Audit

Now is the perfect time to take stock of your finances before we head into Christmas and a brand new year with brand new goals.

Before you can set yourself some money objectives for 2020, you need a clear picture of where you are right now.

A really useful tool I use is the MoneyGirl (Laura Adams) “Personal Financial Statement.”

Basically, you create a simple table of all of your assets and liabilities and the number you come up with at the end of your ‘Net Worth’.

Net worth: For individuals, net worth or wealth refers to an individual’s net economic position, the value of the individual’s assets minus liabilities. Examples of assets that an individual would factor into their net worth include retirement accounts, other investments, home(s), and vehicles. Liabilities include both secured debt (such as a home mortgage) and unsecured debt (such as consumer debt or personal loans). Typically intangible assets such as educational degrees are not factored into net worth, even though such assets positively contribute to one’s overall financial position. (Wikipedia)

Full disclosure, when I first did this about two years ago my Net Worth was about -£10,000. I had no savings, barely anything in my pension and debt in the form of two loans, a credit card and an overdraft. It’s now in the plus and while it’s still not a lot of money, it’s a HUGE difference and I love watching it grow every month. Getting organised and setting goals is the first step.

No matter how bad your finances are, it’s only temporary. Any sacrifices you make are temporary. You will come out the other side and you will be happy that you took control.

Here is my interpretation of the statement- just a simple table to input your totals. Use a formula to add total assets and total liabilities and then another in the net worth column where you minus one from the other. 

Personal Finance StatementNovember 2019
Assets
Sinking Fund
Travel Fund
Stocks and Shares ISA
Lifetime ISA
Pension fund
Asset Subtotal
Liabilities
Overdraft
Credit Card
Mortgage
Liability Subtotal
Net Worth(Assets – Liabilities)


One money objective – 


Financial goals in 2020
1.
2. 
3.

Your net worth is a good benchmark for tracking your financial progress and goals towards retirement. Do not worry about this too much when you are starting your debt free journey and don’t compare yourself to anyone else! Your finances, like everything else, are personal to your situation. 

Once you have worked out your assets and liabilities, think about what you want to achieve with your finances in 2020. Maybe you want to pay down debt or save for a house or another big purchase? Maybe you want to maximise your money by investing?

To keep you on track, set yourself an intention or a money objective that will inform the rest of your plans. 

Then, to make sure you are actually going to be able to achieve this, set yourself some goals for the year. 

  • Pay off XXX in debt
  • Save XX for XX
  • Increase income by XX

Keep coming back to your “why” whenever you are tempted to overspend or dip into your savings. Is this purchase going to get you where you want to be or is it getting in the way of you reaching your long-term goals?

Once you know what you’re working with and where you want to be in 12 months time, then it’s time to make your budget for the holiday season and the year to come.

Now is also a great time to review some of your expenses to make sure you are still getting the best deal for you.

Some items to look into:

  • Insurance – car, travel, home, contents
  • Gas and electricity
  • Internet
  • Mobile phone

Another area to look at while planning is your savings account. Are you getting the best interest rate? You could be missing out on money by leaving your hard-earned savings in an account with a low interest rate.

Setting your 2020 goals before Christmas will (hopefully) have them in front of your mind and help you to curb any overspending. 

Coming soon – a guide to a low cost, low waste Christmas that should help you minimise spending and stay on track for your money goals.

So, you’re out of debt. What next?

I’ve been debt free now for 5 glorious months!

Surprisingly, I feel like that was probably the easy part. It took me about 18 months from when I decided get my shit together until I actually made the last credit card payment.

I forgot to to mention it in the last post but I used Dave Ramsey’s “Debt Snowball” https://www.daveramsey.com/blog/get-out-of-debt-with-the-debt-snowball-plan. It’s a really great method! Reaching each milestone was such amazing motivation.

Staying out of debt hasn’t been hard because not only do I have more money to play with than before, I also still remember the stress that came with it and I could never let myself go there again.

Saving, on the overhand, is proving a lot more challenging than I’d anticipated!

I’ve always been good at saving for travelling and stuff I want but I have a much harder time saving for things that are less tangible like emergencies or ‘rainy day’ savings or big things like a car, house or retirement.
My current savings goals are:

  1. Trip to Vancouver in July
  2. Full emergency fund of three months expenses
  3. A car
  4. Start saving for a house

Goal 1 is going really well for two reasons.

  • I fucking love travelling!
  • It has pretty clear ‘deadline’. If I don’t have the money by July, the trip can’t happen. And it’s definitely happening!

Goal 2 and 3, not so much. I’ve dipped into those pots a few times for non-essentials and am having a much harder time staying motivated. They feel a bit too big and too far away and also less exciting that a holiday or new clothes…..

Goal 4 honestly seems completely out of reach right now. And virtually impossible to make any real commitment towards. I am doing some research at the moment and trying to figure out my best option so this will definitely be a future post.

I’m a spender! I am an absolute sucker for new stuff. And while I’ve become a lot more conscious of the products I buy and where they come from, I still love spending. Instead of random fast fashion, I’m now splurging on house plants and rugs! Hello mid 30s!
I know my weak spots

  • Clothes
  • Food
  • House stuff

So, how do we stay focussed?

1.Use a ‘Zero-Based budget to ensure you’re saving as much as you can

2. Make is easy for yourself.
To get me into better habits, I’ve decided to automate my savings. They will now come straight out of my account a day or two after I get paid and go into an account I can’t easily access. Out of sight, out of mind!

3. Look at your balance
I can’t remember which podcast it was on it was but something the host said really resonated with me. Get used to and excited to see a big number in your bank account. I look at my bank account every morning and it does feel really good to see big numbers! I lived paycheck to paycheck my entire life and now I always have money in my account before payday.

4. Create some “rules” around your spending.
A good rule of thumb before purchases is to ask yourself a few questions. I love these from Money Saving Expert:

Skint? Ask:

  • Do I need it?
  • Can I afford it?

Not skint? Ask:

  • Will I use it?
  • Is it worth it?

5. If you really want it, earn extra money
Another tactic I use to stay on track with savings when I see something I really want to buy is to find a way to make some extra money to pay for it. Some of the ways to do this are similar to how to make extra money to throw at debts.

  • Have a clear out and see if you have anything worth selling
  • Use OhMyDosh to earn some extra cash
  • Get cashback – I’ve just signed up to Quidco to earn cashback on some of my purchases
  • See if you qualify for a “bank bribe” to switch your current account

Whether or not you can be bothered with the extra effort to find the money for something will tell you whether or not you really want it! It also helps to change your mindset when you have to work harder to get that shiny thing you saw and when you get it it feels so much more satisfying.

Lastly, if you do impulse buy you can return it! Don’t take the tags off right away. See if it really does “spark joy” and if not, take it back.

Changing your spending behaviours takes time and you will slip up. Don’t be too hard on yourself. Our relationship with money is deeply personal. It’s cultural. It’s gendered. It’s traditon.

We like to think we are rational beings, but we are more irrational than we realise. Advertisers know this. Marketing relies in behavioural science. They sell you a lifestyle, not a product. They tap into your emotions and insecurities and they are very, very good at it.

Keep an eye on those numbers, watch the debt decrease and the savings increase and your stress start to melt away.

Read: The Minimalists, Dave Ramsey
Listen: Money Girl’s Quick and Dirty Tips, So Money with Farnoosh Torabi
Follow: @FiscalFemme @TheMinmalists