Breaking Up With Fast Fashion

 

What’s in your wardrobe?

It’s time to break up with fast fashion and here are some of the top reasons why:

  • 10% of global carbon emissions come from the fashion industry, which is more than shipping and aviation combined!!
  • 77% of UK retailers believe there is a likelihood of modern slavery in their supply chain

First, take stock.

The thing is – you probably don’t need any new clothes. You likely have lots of beautiful items in your wardrobe you have forgotten about so, have a look in your wardrobe and fall back in love with what you already have. 

If you are feeling overwhelmed by the number of clothes you have, spring is the perfect time to cull your wardrobe!

Get everything out and pile it all in one place, Marie Kondo style, and sort it into categories:

  1. Keep – pretty self-explanatory! These are the clothes you love to wear often.
  2. Repair – many items in your wardrobe can be revived by fixing a zipper, letting a seam out or having the hem taken up. About once a year, I go through my wardrobe and see if there is anything that needs repairing.
  3. Sell – make some extra money by selling things with tags that you are never going to wear or some of your more high-end items that will get a good resale price on eBay, Schpock or Depop.
  4. Donate – for clothes that are in great condition, consider donating them to a charity shop where they can be resold. For things like winter coats and warm clothes, you might want to donate those to your local homeless centre. For torn or unwearable clothes, you may be able to donate them to animal shelters where they can be used as bedding for the animals. When in doubt, give the charity a call to see what they can accept.
  5. Recycle – for anything you can’t donate, find a local organisation that can properly recycle them like Terracycle.

Find a uniform……and then add your personal style

A lot of highly successful people have a ‘uniform’ that they wear every day. Mark Zuckerberg wears a grey t-shirt and jeans. Steve Jobs always wore black turtleneck and jeans. Arianna Huffington is a huge advocate for work uniforms and ‘repeating’ outfits.

If you find deciding what to wear in the morning causes you stress or you just can’t be bothered with the extra steps, a work uniform is a great option. (And if you’re lazy like me, you might also have a non-work uniform!). There is a lot to say for creating a capsule wardrobe of good quality basics that last a long time and fit well. For more on creating a capsule wardrobe, check out Project 333.

Simple, basic and capsule might sound kinda boring but they really don’t have to be. You can make any outfit more interesting with your choice of accessory(ies). Lipstick, jewellery, sunglasses, glasses, hair accessories, nail polish.

Slow fashion

Last year, I started seriously thinking about the impact our fashion habits have on our mental health, our finances and the planet. After watching The True Cost on Netflix, I couldn’t be willfully ignorant any more and I knew that I needed much more sustainable habits, both for my bank balance and for the environment. And as a proud (loud!) feminist, I also knew that the primarily female garment industry was exploiting women in low-income countries.

1 in 6 of the world’s workers are employed in the fashion industry and around 80% of those workers are female.

In January 2019, I finally made the choice not to buy any more fast fashion. So what are the alternatives?

  1. Repair what you have – there is a growing “mending” movement online and you can find amazing tutorials and inspiration.
  2. Swap with and borrow from your friends 
  3. Buy second hand – there are so many secondhand clothing resources in the UK.
  • Charity Shops – you’ll find these on any high street and some bigger organisations, like Amnesty International and Oxfam onlines stores as well.
  • Vintage – there are a lot of incredible and affordable vintage stores like, Rokit .
  • Peer-to peer – buy and sell pre-loved items on apps like Depop, eBay and Schpock
  • Secondhand designer – Vestiarie Collective is my newest obsession – full of beautiful pre-loved designer clothes.

4. Sustainable brands

When buying new clothes, have a list of questions you ask yourself:

  • Is this an ethical brand?
    • I use an app, Good On You, which rates brands on their Labour, Environmental and Animal policies.
  • Is this item going to last a long time?
  • What fabric is this item made from and can it be recycled?
  • If you feel the impulse to buy something, wait 30 days to see if you still want it. Instagram makes EVERYTHING look good and half the time, you will totally forget.

Be aware of “greenwashing”

Companies are aware of the emerging demand for more environmentally friendly and ethically sourced goods. Many will throw in terms like ‘sustainable’, ‘ethical’ and ‘vegan’ into their marketing without any transparency. These terms have no legal definition and absolutely no accountability. I’ve found Good on You to be a great resource for sorting through the bullshit.

Read: Project 333 EcoAge , Mending Matters

Download: Good On You app, Depop app

Follow: @fash_rev @venetiafalconer @ajabarber 

Watch: The Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj – The Ugly Truth of Fast Fashion, The True Cost

Published by leannemcnulty

Currently in London, working as a corporate fundraising manager at a literacy charity. I have always been interested in volunteering, the charity sector and development work. I have taken part in projects in Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Taiwan, Australia and the UK. I am also interested in travel, photography, yoga, reading, music, dancing, cooking (and eating!).

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